4th graders learning about agriculture

Prepping tomorrow's consumers

Feb 08, 2019

Gray skies didn't dampen the spirits of Kansas fourth-graders eager to learn about agriculture. Clambering up on a flat-bed wagon equipped with straw-bale seating, the students, their teachers and local tour guides set off on a Kid's Ag Day adventure. 

Every year since 1993, about 400 students have spent a September school day learning what it takes to produce wheat for their sandwiches, how tractors have evolved over time, why erosion matters and more. 

The event is sponsored by the Great Bend (Kan.) Chamber Ag Committee and involves nearly 100 volunteers and months of planning. The dynamo behind Kid's Ag Day is Jerry Esfeld, a retired fourth-grade teacher who is passionate about sharing her appreciation for agriculture with youngsters. 

Jerry Esfeld at Kid's Ag Day in Kansas

"We are an ag community, but it is amazing how many of our children are clueless when it comes to farming. Still, it's the teachers who say, 'I didn't know that.' We want to spark that enthusiasm so it will be carried over into the classroom."

Some of this year's volunteers were once kids on wagons. "I participated in Kid's Ag Day 14 years ago and have been helping out the last three years," says farmer and seed sales rep Cale Batman. "They're learning what it takes to actually work in ag."

Michael Bahr, a crop consultant, precision ag advisor and farmer, has been working with the event for 22 years. Some of his employees were previous Kid's Ag Day attendees. He says there's value in providing a background in agriculture to children, no matter where their future careers take them. "More than 9,000 kids have gone through the program. Not all of them will come back to this community, but they'll take this information as they become leaders in other communities."

Ron Koelsch, a fourth-generation area farmer, former Great Bend Co-op board member and one of the program originators, says activities like Kid's Ag Day are key to maintaining expertise within the industry. 

"Kids are losing connections with the family farm," say Koelsch. "Many jobs are involved with ag in some way and by stimulating kids' minds about agriculture, we may find the next generation of chemists and soil scientists and others to support family farms."

Great Bend Cooperative Association has long supported Kid's Ag Day and encourages employees to be volunteers, says Dennis Neeland, operations manager. It is one way to keep an increasingly diverse employee base linked with farmers' needs. "We try to teach our employees what the farmer is going through. Every day is a coaching opportunity." 

See more: What a video at chsinc.com/c.

Check out the full C magazine with this article and more.

Scott Henry

Dialing in on diesel

Dialing in on diesel

The U.S. has become a dominant energy producer. Our nation’s oil production is at its highest level on record and the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that volume will continue to increase.

Learn More


Leading for Results 2019 cooperative graduates

CHS, NDSU partnership prepares cooperative leaders for change

CHS, NDSU partnership prepares cooperative leaders for change

Learn More


Men shake hands near propane tanks

CHS Propane advocates for the industry

CHS Propane advocates for the industry

Learn More